The Brief No. 46: Mo’ Data, Mo’ Problems

 
 
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July 17, 2019

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Finale: How Did I Get Here? You really don’t want to miss the third and final installment of Jason Pyrz’ journey to becoming the Global Legal Project Management Operations Manager for Mayer Brown. This story is full of twists, turns, and seeming dead-ends then delivers the satisfactory end we don’t see too often these days (or at least not in our news feed, see below). Enjoy!

Read Part 1

Read Part 2

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Mo’ Data Mo’ Problems: Facebook, Google, and other major tech companies that host, control, and mine data must prepare for the gentrification and regulation of the Wild West. As usual, they’re not taking this disruption to business-as-usual sitting down. Facebook’s attorney is arguing that a new privacy regulation aimed at reigning data sharing under consideration by the EU’s highest court could have major and negative implications on service-related trade. As regulators from multiple angles and nations close in, Facebook is asserting “we won’t stop” as it attempts to break into the cryptocurrency game with Libra. Meanwhile, world financial leaders are warning Facebook that “we don’t play” and that their motto of “move fast and break things” will not work here.

Another Week, Another Almost Constitutional Crisis: The familiar pattern of escalating a potential crisis, backing down, and claiming an alternative path to winning a battle was on repeat again this week. The United States President threatened to defy the orders of the US Supreme Court and place the citizenship question on the 2020 Census only to back down, claiming he would obtain this information via alternative means. Other underlying tensions and challenges of the many people who have been living and building their lives in the US for decades without documentation hit closer to home for the legal community this week. Sergio Garcia, a California barred attorney who has been technically undocumented for 25 years, finally being sworn in as a citizen of the United States of America on June 20, 2019. 

#MeToo Victims Acosta’d: Wealthy and powerful predators are having more trouble evading consequences tantamount to their crimes. Wealthy financier Jeffrey Epstein, who previously received a 12-month prison sentence where he was allowed to leave jail 12 hours a day, 6 days a week to “work” for the sex trafficking and forcible rape of underage girls in 2008, is once again facing charges for sex trafficking of underage girls. Labor Secretary Alexander Acosta who intervened for the 2008 “sweetheart deal” defended his role before resigning. Meanwhile, Harvey Weinstein is on his third legal team after his last attorney removed himself from the case due to Mr. Weistein’s behavior and requests. Weinstein’s new attorney, Donna Rotunno, held a press conference claiming her team will prove consensuality.

Smackdowns: The litigation finance world is grappling with a slew of new bills and laws that intend to unveil funders in the name of transparency. But funders argue that regulators are intentionally obfuscating the differences between consumer and commercial litigation funding in order to play on public sentiment. Speaking of transparency, the southern district of NY announced that Jon Montroll AKA “Ukyo”, Bitcoin conman has been sentenced to 14 months in prison for lying to his investors. And Bitcoin haters all over the world are yelling, “I told you so!”

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Understanding the SAT— As a select group of America’s wealthiest parents face the music for their roles in the college admissions scandals, Vox dives into the history and efficacy of the SAT. Technically the SAT is a psychometric test and came on the scene soon after WWII. But as psychometrics start to become the norm in an employment setting, we’d be wise to learn from the past to avoid repeating its mistakes. Nostalgic for the LSAT? Here’s a great podcast from Revisionist History on it.

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